English Civil War

As with all civil wars, this was a bloody conflict with appalling causalities. The tour guides you through the various battle sites and ends in London where you can stand at the place where King Charles 1 was tried and executed. Also, you will be shown Musket and Pike drill and the military tactics of the time.

The date is Autumn 2022

The cost – including breakfast, lunch, dinner, hotel accommodation, coach, museums and guide, but not drinks. – is £1,250 per person. Please note that this is the cost of a single occupancy in a single room as we wish to be open with the all-inclusive costs. A discount of 10% is available for bookings with two people sharing a room.

You are accompanied by a tour leader to ensure that your tour runs smoothly.

This is a coach tour and your tour guide is John Sadler

TO SECURE YOUR PLACE TO ENGLISH CIVIL WAR PLEASE PAY A 10% DEPOSIT ON THE BUTTONS BELOW.


I am Interested

Your Guide

John Sadler.

John Sadler is a British historian specialising in the English Civil War. Sadler is a regular contributor to military and historical journals and has published a number of books on the subject.

Itinerary

Day 1

Meet at the Honourable Artillery Company in London for Pike and Musket drill. After lunch drive to York.

Day 2

The siege of York and the Battle of Marston Moor. The battle of Marston Moor is believed to have been the largest battle ever fought on English soil. In just a couple of hours the fate of York and control of the North was decided, the royalist Northern army was effectively destroyed, and Prince Rupert and the royalist cavalry lost their reputation as an invincible force. But perhaps most importantly in the long term, the Eastern Association forces prevailed under Oliver Cromwell, making his name as great commander and showing how a well-equipped, trained and committed parliamentarian army could win the war.   

Day 3

Siege of Newark and the English Civil War centre

Day 4

Drive to the Battle of Naseby site where the Roundhead army routed the Royalists, leading to Parliament’s final victory, putting King Charles I in a position from which he would never regain the trust of his people –  which, in turn, would eventually lead to his execution and Britain’s brief experiment with republicanism

Day 5

Drive to London Houses of Parliament and Banqueting House in Whitehall, famous as the site of the execution of King Charles I. On 30 January 1649, many spectators gathered to watch the beheading on the balcony of Banqueting House. A service is held at the Banqueting House every year in January to commemorate this event and visitors can still see the scaffold stage on which the monarch died.